The Telegraph GIN Experience by Sophie Judd

Competition winner Sophie Judd attended the 2019 Telegraph Gin Experience and here is what she thought….

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What do you get if you take a stunning Georgian clubhouse within a green metropolitan oasis and fill it with over 50 unique and delicious gins from around the world?

You get the Telegraph Gin Experience. And that, my friends, equates to time very well spent.

This August I was lucky enough to tick off one of my bucket list’s longest standing items and attend London’s ultimate gin event, hosted at the Hurlingham Club. The Hurlingham Suite transforms into an apothecary of gin-based marvels adorned with more botanicals than even Mother Nature knew she could grow.

Sampling as many gins as possible, whilst remaining sober enough to remark convincingly upon the tasting notes of subtle local variations, demands a well thought out strategy. I know this only with the benefit of hindsight (ah, so that’s what those spittoon things were for...). Miraculously, my senses served me well enough to identify three wildly different but clear favorite bottles, which are now nestled amongst loyal friends Bombay Sapphire and Adnam’s Copperhouse atop the humble dresser in my Dulwich sitting room.

Here are my top three recommendations – and fail safe new answers to the taxing and-which-gin- would-you-like-Miss question that is increasingly posed by London bar tenders:

1. Artisanal produce of the Chateau de Bonbonnet in France, Citadelle is quite simply the crispest gin I have ever had the joy of tasting. 19 aromatics and botanicals make this gin paired with a classic tonic and lemon summer in a glass.

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2. Another but entirely different French gin, G-Vine defies tradition using grapes and vine blossoms. June, G-Vine’s newest liqueur, is packed full of sweetness from wild peach and summer fruits and is best served on ice as an afternoon tipple.

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3. Finally, Ophir Oriental’s Smoldering Spice variety is even more gloriously intense than its original. This London dry gin is made with Indian black pepper, Moroccan coriander and other botanicals from the Silk Road spice route.

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Thank you to The Telegraph and The Hurlingham Club for bringing together such connoisseurs of gin at this event of dreams. Your contributions to the field of G&T are truly Nobel Prize worthy.

Follow Sophie on Instagram: @sophienjudd